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angryjay93

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Thanks guys. What I don't get is how the checker has to be at least 2 points heavier than the guy in order to successfully check him. Does that mean that for example, Cam Neely usually can't check Kirk Muller despite being heavier than him, even when using this C/B check? That seems strange.

I find that in SNES, even light guys are able to check heavy guys under the right circumstances (speed, timing and checking angle seem to matter).

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I couldn't follow all the code involved in checking, but it starts with subtracting one players weight index (0-16 number) times 10 from the other guy's, then doing some 'magic' before finally deciding if the check is successful. The way it turns out, basically (normal C check, weight bug), you have to weigh 2 points less than a guy to check him ~100% of the time. If you only weigh 1 point less, the check succeeds less consistently, same weigh even less consistent, etc etc.

For the CB check, it might work a bit differently, because the CB check is caused by some code that basically said "if you control the player (or maybe it was if you don't control the player?), start the calculation with a value of 120". Maybe that code is just there so that when the CPU throws a check, it is guaranteed to work. So I wonder if the CB check will pretty much always work, regardless of the weights of the players involved? Has anyone noticed CB checks failing?

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I couldn't follow all the code involved in checking, but it starts with subtracting one players weight index (0-16 number) times 10 from the other guy's, then doing some 'magic' before finally deciding if the check is successful. The way it turns out, basically (normal C check, weight bug), you have to weigh 2 points less than a guy to check him ~100% of the time. If you only weigh 1 point less, the check succeeds less consistently, same weigh even less consistent, etc etc.

For the CB check, it might work a bit differently, because the CB check is caused by some code that basically said "if you control the player (or maybe it was if you don't control the player?), start the calculation with a value of 120". Maybe that code is just there so that when the CPU throws a check, it is guaranteed to work. So I wonder if the CB check will pretty much always work, regardless of the weights of the players involved? Has anyone noticed CB checks failing?

I've been playing a lot of games against the computer the last month and I've been doing some testing with CB checking. I think the game does use a slightly different value to calculate whether a check will be successful. It seems trying to CB a heavier player with a lighter one works more consistently then trying to C check a lighter player with a heavier one. Still, CBing a heavy player with a light guy isn't anywhere near as consistent as using it with a heavier player to hit a lighter one.

Thanks guys. What I don't get is how the checker has to be at least 2 points heavier than the guy in order to successfully check him. Does that mean that for example, Cam Neely usually can't check Kirk Muller despite being heavier than him, even when using this C/B check? That seems strange.

I find that in SNES, even light guys are able to check heavy guys under the right circumstances (speed, timing and checking angle seem to matter).

Yes, it is true that Cam Neely has a tougher time checking Kirk Muller with a CB check than he would Brian Bellows. In Gens the game doesn't weigh speed as heavily as the SNES does so it is much trickier to overcome weight differences.

Speed and agility only really come into factor if a player can mathematically check a player consistently to begin with. This is why Al Iafrate is a better CB checker then Dave Andreychuk despite having the same weight attribute.

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Playing against Seth a bunch, I tend to think CB checking works a lot more when guys are equal weights than regular C. And similarly when the weights are 1 point apart, in either direction!

After I clone myself, this is something I'd love to test. Do 100 checks and 100 CB checks with players of same weight, 1 weight different, 2 weight different, 3 weight...and tally the results.

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Does this mean CB could work with some consistency in the 2on2 roms, where everyone is the same weight?

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You can't use B to switch your player in 2on2 unless your teammate is stuck on goalie lock, though. Wouldn't that mean you can't do it?

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Yes, it is true that Cam Neely has a tougher time checking Kirk Muller with a CB check than he would Brian Bellows. In Gens the game doesn't weigh speed as heavily as the SNES does so it is much trickier to overcome weight differences.

Speed and agility only really come into factor if a player can mathematically check a player consistently to begin with. This is why Al Iafrate is a better CB checker then Dave Andreychuk despite having the same weight attribute.

Cool, thanks. I like that the speed of the checker weighs in a bit more in SNES. So a small, light guy like Gilmour or Fleury generally gets pushed around, but can still run over a heavy player if he builds up enough speed and hits him at the right time. But I don't want to turn this into another console debate.

The point, is, great work AJ, keep up the good work.

Edited by Bob Kudelski

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Uh huh

post-1168-0-44635300-1443561527_thumb.jp

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You can't use B to switch your player in 2on2 unless your teammate is stuck on goalie lock, though. Wouldn't that mean you can't do it?

Ahh good point. Not a lot of use in that case.

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If someone programmed the Y button for 2v2 to goalie switch, then in theory, you could C/B.

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