TruePensFan1981

NHLPA '93 Fighting Experiments

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I decided to experiment with fights in NHLPA '93 using Chicago and Detroit. My aim was to stage fights between Stu Grimson and Bob Probert, while changing their aggression, roughness, and fighting ratings.

While my intention was to have only Grimson/Probert fights, some other players stepped in at times. Nevertheless, I noted the results (and what their ratings were). I will paste the results, and you will see my conclusions in my response to this initial post.

Without further ado, here were the fighting results.

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Stu Grimson: 0 fighting, 100 aggression, 100 roughness (never fought)

Bob Probert: 100 fighting, 100 aggression, 100 roughness

Steve Smith: 71 fighting, 100 aggression, 46 roughness

***Steve Smith lost after Bob Probert landed 11 punches***

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Bob Probert: 100 fighting, 100 aggression, 100 roughness

Stu Grimson: 100 fighting, 100 aggression, 100 roughness

***Bob Probert lost after Grimson landed 15 punches***

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Bob Probert: 100 fighting, 100 aggression, 100 roughness

Stu Grimson: 100 fighting, 100 aggression, 86 roughness

Ray Sheppard: 14 fighting, 26 aggression, 86 roughness

***Ray Sheppard lost after Grimson landed 6 punches***

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Bob Probert: 100 fighting, 100 aggression, 0 roughness

Stu Grimson: 100 fighting, 100 aggression, 86 roughness

***Bob Probert lost after Grimson landed 15 punches***

______________________________________________________________

Bob Probert: 100 fighting, 100 aggression, 0 roughness

Rob Brown: 71 fighting, 66 aggression, 46 roughness

***Rob Brown lost after Probert landed 11 punches***

______________________________________________________________

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Does roughness determine how many punches you can take?

Roughness does NOT determine how many punches you can take before losing. Both Probert and Grimson had 100 ratings for fighting, aggression, AND roughness. When their ratings were identical, Probert lost after Grimson landed 15 punches.

When Probert and Grimson both had 100 for fighting and aggression, but Probert had a 0 for roughness and Grimson had a 100 for roughness, Probert once again lost after taking 15 punches from Grimson. Therefore, we can conclude that roughness does not affect a fighter’s ability to take punches. That is in the FIGHTING rating.

Does 100 fighting but lower roughness mean you need more punches to win?

NO. Roughness does not determine how many punches you need to win. Your FIGHTING rating determines how many punches you can take, and how many punches you need to win.

Steve Smith had a 71 fighting, 100 aggression, and 46 roughness when he faced Bob Probert’s 100 fighting, 100 aggression, and 100 roughness. Probert won after landing 11 punches.

Rob Brown had the SAME fighting rating as Steve Smith (71), and faced a LOWER-ROUGHNESS Bob Probert. Brown’s 71 fighting, 66 aggression, and 46 roughness lost to Bob Probert’s 100 fighting, 100 aggression, and 0 roughness after Probert landed 11 punches (the same number of punches it took him to KO 71-fighting Smith while having a perfect roughness rating).

We can conclude that roughness does NOT determine how many punches you need to win, or how many punches you can take. That is determined solely by your fighting rating.

What does roughness determine?

I do not know. It could possibly determine how often you fight; however, I must note that Grimson DID NOT FIGHT AT ALL when he had a zero fighting, 100 aggression, and 100 roughness.

If roughness does not pertain to how often a player fights, then MAYBE it determines a player’s likelihood of injuring another player DURING the fight? I noticed that Grimson was making heads bleed more frequently when his roughness rating was 100; however, this could be just coincidental.

What does aggression determine?

I believe we can all agree that aggression determines how likely a player is to get penalized for hooking, cross-checking, and other infractions.

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I still cant seem to start many fights with the fighting rom

I don't know what rom you're using, but I did these experiments with the original NHLPA '93 rom. I get a decent number of fights with 10-minute periods when the correct players are on the ice (guys like Grimson, Probert, etc). The aim of my experiment, though, was to figure out what the ratings mean, rather than finding out how often people fight.

The only mystery that remains is roughness. After my conclusions, I think roughness just determines how likely you are to injure another player in a fight (or perhaps even with checks).

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I don't know what rom you're using, but I did these experiments with the original NHLPA '93 rom. I get a decent number of fights with 10-minute periods when the correct players are on the ice (guys like Grimson, Probert, etc). The aim of my experiment, though, was to figure out what the ratings mean, rather than finding out how often people fight.

The only mystery that remains is roughness. After my conclusions, I think roughness just determines how likely you are to injure another player in a fight (or perhaps even with checks).

Wouldn't roughness just determine how likely you are to be given a penalty? Or maybe that is the aggression attribute? Players with high aggression and high roughness are always getting sent to the box. You may want to run an experiement to see which is.

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