halifax

Halifax's SNES NHL94 bible camp.

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Praise the nhl94 gods...welcome to bible camp. I posted some information for everyone to read on suggestions I have for playing nhl94 for SNES. Hope you enjoy.

Note: The info provided is for playing against another player, penalties on, no offsides (the standard for classic league.)

Centre Ice face offs

1. Angle your controller to a defencemen. Left handed centre, try and win draw to right defencemen…right handed centre, try and win draw to left defencemen. If you win the draw, look for your centremen to split the D(if he’s fast) and feed him a pass. It’s mostly a personal preference for me that I like to pass to guy on his forehand, which is the way he’ll face when you hit with a pass. This is an excellent breakaway opportunity. A goal can reasonably be scored 7 seconds off the face off. (I have seenit done in 6 seconds but only once).

2. If you lose the draw, you have some choices. If you have a heavy centre, and the other centre is light, you can knock him down. Otherwise, you can pressure the defence or retreat into a defensive zone position depending on the score.

End zone Face offs – Offence.

Look to win the draw straight back to your D man.

1. You can the attack the net right away with the D man and try for a quick deke goal.

2. Pass to your opposite D-man for the one timer (sometimes this can be done so fast the opponent has no chance to react).

3. Take your d-man and skate across the slot to the opposing side, you’ll find quite often a player will sit in the slot waiting for a one timer. Feed him the pass.

End zone faceoffs – defence.

Look to win the draw to the boards or d-man and look for the streaking winger for a quick outlet.

Offensive strategies

1. Carry the puck up and look make a pass to an open man, especially when you are about to get checked.

2. Try and avoid using D-men to carry the puck (unless you are a skilled dangler). If you get caught or knocked down, it usually is turned into an odd man rush or breakaway for your opponent.

3. Hit the lead man with a pass and then dropping the pass back to a trailing player and then pass forward again to that same player. This can quickly turn into an odd man rush or breakaway situation.

4. When taking the puck into an offensive corner, there’s normally 3 outlet plays.

- you can take the puck behind the net and look for a member in the slot or circle for a one timer. If the player is in the circle, then aim the one timer for the far side of the net. (you can control where you where your one timers go by aiming with the control pad).

- Take the puck for a cut across the crease. This play has many options. You can look for a one timer and take it…look for an open one timer and then deke, you can turn 180 degree and put it short side. Whatever can get the opponents goalie out of position.

- You can pass the puck back outside the zone. This can be very effective as the opponents ai players will chase and sometimes leave open an opportunity to pass back in for a breakaway or odd man rush.

5. Straight up the middle. If you’re good at dangling, then this is where you should be. Anticipate the opponents checks by stopping or spinning away. Forehand dekes will always give you a better chance to score but going back hand is necessary at times to avoid being predictable.

Defensive strategies

Unless you have preference, pressure the opponent when you’re losing, sit back when you’re winning.

1. If your opponent is in his own zone, take some time and knock down as many ai opponents as you can.

2. Many opponents tend to look at the lead man with their breakout pass. Anticipate this and look to take him out when the pass is in progress. You’ll knock him down or intercept the pass and create a turnover.

3. Try and select a winger as your defensive player when coming back. You’ll find that your d-men and centreman will plug up the middle and having the extra forward in middle, drastically cuts down on one timer passes and guys trying to dangle through. Sometimes the AI will take out the opponent for you.

4. Use the hold on opponents that like to dangle with heavy players. Body check down the lighter players and if you’re not sure then sometimes doing nothing but keeping your player between your opponent and the goal works too. Doing nothing is very key when you hear the ‘beep’ for a breakaway signal. If you check the player you’ll likely give up a penalty shot. Try and get in between the opponent and the goal and do nothing except keep him between you and the goal and force him to pass off.

5. Anticipate the one timer in front of the net by intercepting the pass or knocking down the forward before they even get the chance to shoot.

Goaltending

1. On one timers, get out as far as you can to cut down the angle.

2. Use the save button on dekes and try and time it when he’s about to shoot. When the goalie is in the net at the top of the screen, if you stay square in the middle of the net and time the shot to pressing your save button, the goalie does a two pad stack which is very difficult to score on. It does not work as well when the goalie is in the net at the bottom of the screen.

3. The dive feature should not be used very often. It is a very risky play because if you miss, your goalie takes longer to get back into position and by then it’s usually too late.

4. Never chase your opponent around the net. The goalie is not fast enough to catch him and the puck will usually be in your net.

5. The goalie smash is a good skill to have. Take every opportunity to hit opposing players with your goalie when he can get the puck (and even when your goalie has the puck), as it can sometimes cause your opponent to take an interference penalty. It’s also a great method for stopping your opponent for trying to cut across the crease.

6. Only make a pass when it is safe to do so and stay close or in your net when making the pass, just incase it is picked off then your goalie will not be out of position. Opposing players will try and eliminate your pass by taking out your players. If there’s no clear play then hold onto it. The only time you might get rid of it is if time is winding down and it’s a one-goal game. If you push in the direction of the opposite goal and hit the Y button, the goalie will flip it over your opponents and down the ice. You have to have a bit of a clear lane to do this.

7. You want to avoid giving up end zone face offs when possible. And especially late in the game. A goal can reasonably be scored in 4 seconds off the face off. (Only a couple times I’ve seen it happen in 3 seconds).

Penalty shots

1. Take two small steps to either side of the face off down and head straight towards the net. If your opponent is not set, you can use the pass button and aim towards the corner of the net for a goal.

2. A slap shot from the slot can also catch your opponent off guard.

3. You have quite a bit of time to skate around with it, so you don’t just have to skate right in, you can move around a bit if you prefer deking better.

One timer.

1. You can aim your one timers to the corner you want to shoot at.

2. If you just hit the shoot button without giving it any direction, the player will shoot it dead centre of the net.

3. Sometimes look to pass to wingers off screen. With enough practice you’ll just know they are there. Send them a pass (no matter how bad the angle) and hit the shoot button. Even if the one timer is shot from the goal line it will go in (as in it hit the centre of the net). It looks like it should not happen, but it works.

4. When you have a teammate in behind the net and you are in front, send him a pass. Quite often it will go in the net for a goal regardless of the position of the goalie.

Dump and Chase.

There are not many guys that like to use this but it can be very effective, especially on the PK with some fast forwards. Make sure you are pushing towards the opposite end of the rink and press the Y button to flip the puck. The puck can sometimes sail over top of your opponents; meanwhile you’re already hammering on your speed burst, there’s a great chance you can get to the puck first. You’ll find that usually another forward has quickly caught up and this can be a great time for a one timer your opponent might not be ready for. Throw back a pass to a forward who’s not even on screen yet and do a one timer as well.

The ‘Y’ trick.

When your player falls down. Press Y right away to get back up. Sometimes if you time it right, you can get back up fast enough and have your opponent (who just checked you) in a hold position.

What to do when being held

Look to pass it off. Most of the time you will lose the puck if you hope to break free but getting a pass off before you get knocked down is a good way to salvage the situation.

Defense control

It is an excellent element to the game. Use your left trigger to automatically select you LD or right trigger to select your RD. There’s times when you can chase down an opponent and make him think you wont catch him but then switch to the d man to get in a body check at a time when he can’t react. The same can go for switching to the goalie. Making that switch last second to make the save.

Try and force your opponent towards one side of the net when chasing him. When you do this, your opponent will only have one side that they can deke to. You can then switch to your goalie and use the save button and your opponent will have nothing to shoot at.

Slap shot goal

Slap shot goals are rare in SNES against AI controlled goalies; It is a low percentage play. There is, however, a sweet spot on the bottom half of the rink in the slot around the hash marks. Aim towards the left side and you can bury a slap shot in the corner.

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This is an interesting read. Thanks Hali.

I suggest adding something under the "End zone faceoffs – defence" section:

Win the draw straight back to your defenceman, use the Y button to flip the puck over the crowd and straight up the ice, parallel to the boards. Immediately switch to your board-side winger and speedburst down the ice in pursuit of the puck, catching your opponent flat-footed. If you can reach the puck before the opposing goalie, look for a quick one-timer opportunity in the slot, but watch out for the defenceman rushing back to crush you into the endboards.

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....a two pad stack....does not work as well when the goalie is in the net at the bottom of the screen....and....There is....a sweet spot on the bottom half of the rink in the slot around the hash marks. Aim towards the left side and you can bury a slap shot in the corner.
really? hmm...

this is a fairly thorough guide, but it could use some basics, too. an in-depth lesson on "the move" would be nice, but I don't feel like doing that right now. the same goes for a cut-across play. diagrams or short videos might be nice for these types of examples. as for your time estimates, you can score in faster than six seconds with a rare slapper or flukey goal and I'm pretty sure it can even be two seconds after a faceoff in an offensive zone with a onetimer. your records in goal speed seem to be for onetimers and deke goals, which makes sense, because flukey and slapped goals are very rare and not a good idea to try, unless the clock is down to a few seconds. another trick I often use is to take a durable dude (high endurance and stick handling) with the puck for a ride on a weak-checking opponent, sticking to him for protection in the offensive zone until a nice pass opens up. you were right to focus on the pad-stacking move, as the dive is a tough play to use well, but the dive can be great for blocking corner shots and onetimers in the air or pouncing on a puck behind the net. a focus on poke-checking is key, especially if you are playing with fatigue, for it is the speedburst check that really wears a player down. the poke check is an alternate way to take down guys that maintain well, too. if you are playing with penalties on, focus on the reputation ratings ("aggression" is its misnomer) so the refs aren't as tempted to whistle for the special teams. don't forget that your timeout will rest everybody. when on the kill, don't neglect offensive chances, as there seems to be something about the open ice or mismatches that leads to nice opportunities that should not be neglected. I'm done, for now, but there is always more.

control.jpg

L = left defenseman control

R = right defenseman control

u, l, r, d = up, left, right, down directional movement

X = goaltender control

Y = dive, stand up, flip toss, hook, hold, vogue

A = stack pads, skate, check, shoot, kill

B = pass, player selection, poke check, steal, trip

s = line change

S = start, menu

Edited by trudatman

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This is good stuff -- some of it applies to GENS as well. It'd be nice to have a guide like this in both SNES and GENS forums, but to make it a wiki if possible. That way people can add/edit continuously.

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This is good stuff -- some of it applies to GENS as well. It'd be nice to have a guide like this in both SNES and GENS forums, but to make it a wiki if possible. That way people can add/edit continuously.

Thanks bud...smoz will wiki it up.

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as for your time estimates, you can score in faster than six seconds with a rare slapper or flukey goal and I'm pretty sure it can even be two seconds after a faceoff in an offensive zone with a onetimer.

The fastest I ever scored from center ice faceoff is 4 seconds. It was the first faceoff of the game. I won the faceoff, my center kept the puck so I started up ice. As I crossed the blue line(breakaway), I got checked and got a penalty shot and scored. I know it was a cheap goal but never seen a 4 second goal to start a game.

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Hey, I had actually made a post here and I had wrote a few good tips and notes concerning the gameplay. Why was it deleted?

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While having an AIM conversation with Halifax tonight, I was encouraged to share some knowledge I had in this topic and so I've decided to share some info I've stumbled on and "discovered" regarding slapshots and how to score with them more often (even versus other human players)... And so here's what I have to contribute to bible camp...

General Overview

It goes without saying that the higher a skater's shot power and shot accuracy, the greater the chances of successfully scoring against a cpu goalie. That being said, lining up the slapshot and timing the slapshot take highest priority when attempting to score against a cpu goalie when a human skater might be sitting back awaiting a deke or performing a backcheck with a forward. As Halifax previously mentioned, it is best to aim the shot at the top corners of the net in order to have the best chance of scoring a goal.

Now we move onto the principles of lining up, timing, and ultimately unleashing a 100 mph rocket headed for the back of the net...

Lining up the shot

There are 2 positions that can be taken with your skater that appear to increase the likelihood of the slapshot becoming a goal:

Position 1: Puck in-line with the post

Though this idea is borrowed from the Gens version of NHL 94, it still applies to this position in the SNES version. Simply enough, you bring your skater up or down towards the goalie and time the shot to where when your skater begins to wind up for the shot and also when his stick makes contact with the puck, the puck is "lined" up with the goal post of the side/corner you are trying to aim for.

Here are a few screenshots depicting Eric Lindros lining up a slapshot going south against the goalie:

SouthSlapperSweetSpot1.jpg

SouthSlapperSweetSpot2.jpg

SouthSlapperSweetSpot3.jpg

There is some give or take with "lining up" the shot. Sometimes, the shot may not appear to be lined up as well as you'd like, but you'll find that it goes in anyway, or you may be approaching the goalie from a slight angle and take the slapper and it will go in even though the puck was not lined up with the post. Again, simple give and take (and more often than not, luck).

Here are two screenshots of Dimitri Yushkevich skating north and lining up a shot. Notice the priciple of "give and take" in full effect as the "shoot" button was hit as the puck was lined up with the post, but the shot did not actually occur until Yushkevich was more in between the two goal posts:

SlapperSweetSpot.jpg

SlapperSweetSpot3.jpg

Position 2: Skater in-line with the post

The same idea as lining up the puck with the post. You line your skater up for the shot and time it to where he will shoot the puck as he is in-line with the post. For the most part, this position is effective when aiming for the post opposite of the post that you have lined your skater up with. Again, give or take applies, but the more the skater is lined up with the post, the likelihood of scoring with a slapshot on the SNES appears to be somewhat greater when aiming for the opposite post.

Timing the shot

Aside from shot power and accuracy, timing appears to be the most crucial element of scoring with a slapshot. Aside from the timing methods listed above, the best generalization of when the shot should be taken has everything to do with the goalie's positioning. The trick is timing the shot to come off the skater's stick as the goalie is moving further away from the net to contest the shot and stop it. Precisely, if the goalie as at the maximum distance that the cpu will ever take him away from the net in normal play (without being pulled for an extra attacker or moved away in a manual goalie move), the slapshot seems to consistently slip by the goalie. From there, the shot is either going to sail wide and above the net, hit the post, or hit the back of the net for a goal.

Final notes and Conclusion

One thing should always be remembered; the slapshot is a lower percentage scoring chance. No matter how much a person works to develop the move, there is no set formula or method for scoring with a slapshot. In experimenting against the cpu (playing games where I would only score with slapshots in best of 7 mode), I had games where I scored 3 slapshot goals using 5 min periods and no offside and I had some games where it took 5 periods of OT to even win the game 1-0.

One other important thing to note is that Ray Bourque appears to be the only player in the SNES game that can score on slapshots more consistently than any other player in the game. I believe this is due to the fact that defenseman in general appear to be programmed to have higher shot power than forwards regardless of ratings as evidenced by seeing big blasts from players such as Igor Kravchuk, Geoff Smith, and Dimitri Yushkevich despite these players having modest shot power ratings. In Bourque's case, he boasts shot power and accuracy consistently above 80 each game. Combining his natural power as a D-man with his high shot power rating and accuracy and inexplicably, Ray Bourque becomes a weapon with slapshots if one can set him up effectively.

That's about it folks. I hope you enjoyed reading about the least used scoring method on the SNES version of NHL 94 (and with no surprise due to the inconsistency of slapshots on the SNES). Hopefully, this gives you one more move to use every now and then that may generate a laugh, a surprising goal, or maybe even a back-breaking OT goal that leaves your opponent speechless after a grueling and hard fought game.

Edited by Oilers442

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Oilers,

That is a great write up. Just the kind of thing this site(thread) needs. In my earlier post, I had mentioned a "sweet spot" around the hashmarks going down. As trudatman already mentioned, screen shots would help with explanations and you captivated it perfectly with those diagrams. Thanks!

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You're very welcome Halifax and I hope the rest of the SNES guys enjoy my info as well. I added two new screenshots to it depicting a slapshot going north against the goalie. Ray Bourque slapshot video is still being worked on as I type this right now :)

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The fastest goal I know is called the ''Carse shot'' as I like to call it.

You try to win the faceoff with your LW. Then you cut in between the C/RW and the RD. At that point you begin charging the net and scorer with a little fake to the inside.

Clocked goal is 7 seconds.

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Okay folks, the Ray Bourque slapshot video has arrived.

I didn't get quite the results I was looking for due to recently having a single game where I scored with Ray's slappers 5 times. However, 3 slapshot goals (2 going north) and 1 shot off the post (no small feat with a normal shooter especially going north) is enough to show that Ray Bourque can be a weapon with slapshots on the SNES and appears to have something of a more "gifted" slapshot than any other skater in SNES NHL 94.

I will also embed this video into the post I created about slapshots.

Edited by Oilers442

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great stuff. slow-motion replays of instructional examples are key in these types of videos, though. if it's easy to shoot another video featuring just slow and regular replays, I suggest it. this is a great example the "content" I'm mentioning so frequently in response to those that add none. thanks for being helpful.

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Well, the video wasn't necessarily done for tutorial/instructional purposes. It was more meant to simply show the power of using Ray Bourque in slapshot situations. When I talked to Halifax via AIM last night and mentioned Bourque's abilities, Halifax asked me to record a full game in real time to prove that Bourque can land more than an odd slapper or two a game, hence the video I posted that shows no replays, etc...

Needless to say, I couldn't replicate a 5 slapper goal game I previously had with Ray, but I think 3 slapshot goals and a shot off the post in one game proves that Bourque has some sort of "special" ability for slapshots against cpu goalies that other players simply don't have in the SNES version .

However, I like your suggestion. It is pretty easy to go back and make a tutorial video off previous highlights that I have. I will do one soon and add it to my slapshot knowledge in my previous post :)

Edited by Oilers442

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Well, the video wasn't necessarily done for tutorial/instructional purposes. It was more meant to simply show the power of using Ray Bourque in slapshot situations. When I talked to Halifax via AIM last night and mentioned Bourque's abilities, Halifax asked me to record a full game in real time to prove that Bourque can land more than an odd slapper or two a game, hence the video I posted that shows no replays, etc...

Needless to say, I couldn't replicate a 5 slapper goal game I previously had with Ray, but I think 3 slapshot goals and a shot off the post in one game proves that Bourque has some sort of "special" ability for slapshots against cpu goalies that other players simply don't have in the SNES version .

However, I like your suggestion. It is pretty easy to go back and make a tutorial video off previous highlights that I have. I will do one soon and add it to my slapshot knowledge in my previous post :)

Both c4outlaws and I score a lot of slapshot goals. It's not that rare and you don't need Bourque to score many. I have recorded many zmv's with different players scoring slapshot goals. I will edit them together sometime.

Shot Power seem to be the key. Good accuracy is preferred but the power is more important.

I've scored a lot of slappers with Hull, Chiasson, Blake, Jeff Brown and even Modano (crap accuracy but high power).

Of course the technique is the most important thing. I've even scored slappers from the blue line with players that have both crap accuracy and power. Looks really funny.

Usually the puck goes in when the goalie is doing that "dog move", lifting his leg :)

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Both c4outlaws and I score a lot of slapshot goals. It's not that rare and you don't need Bourque to score many. I have recorded many zmv's with different players scoring slapshot goals. I will edit them together sometime.

Shot Power seem to be the key. Good accuracy is preferred but the power is more important.

I've scored a lot of slappers with Hull, Chiasson, Blake, Jeff Brown and even Modano (crap accuracy but high power).

Of course the technique is the most important thing. I've even scored slappers from the blue line with players that have both crap accuracy and power. Looks really funny.

Usually the puck goes in when the goalie is doing that "dog move", lifting his leg :)

Interesting info Xot. I'm certainly interested in seeing your zmv videos in the future :)

But have you been able to score 3-5 slapshot goals in one game vs. cpu on a semi-regular basis? Ray Bourque is the only player I can do it with and I do not change my slapshot technique at all when I use him compared to other great shooters. That's why I still believe that Bourque has some sort of "hidden" ability. Almost every shot of his comes off his stick like a laser (at least 50 to 75% of the time) and I find that cpu goalies tend to "barely" make the save against Bourque on rougly half of his shots compared to most other shooters...

Maybe it's just me I guess. Somehow slapshot goals just feel like they come easier with Bourque for me...

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Interesting info Xot. I'm certainly interested in seeing your zmv videos in the future :)

But have you been able to score 3-5 slapshot goals in one game vs. cpu on a semi-regular basis? Ray Bourque is the only player I can do it with and I do not change my slapshot technique at all when I use him compared to other great shooters. That's why I still believe that Bourque has some sort of "hidden" ability. Almost every shot of his comes off his stick like a laser (at least 50 to 75% of the time) and I find that cpu goalies tend to "barely" make the save against Bourque on rougly half of his shots compared to most other shooters...

Maybe it's just me I guess. Somehow slapshot goals just feel like they come easier with Bourque for me...

Considering Bourque is one of only 3 players with a 5/5 shot power/accuracy rating, this is really not surprising ;)

Roenick and Ciccarelli are the other two.

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Considering Bourque is one of only 3 players with a 5/5 shot power/accuracy rating, this is really not surprising ;)

Roenick and Ciccarelli are the other two.

That's the odd thing for me, I can't score 3-5 slapshot goals per game with Roenick and Ciccarelli despite their shot ratings :o

It could be because they are right handed and maybe I gravitate more naturally to left handed shooters with my slapshot style. However, if someone posts up an SNES NHL 94 video where they can score 3 or more slapshot goals in a 5 min, no offside game against the cpu, I will gladly admit that my theories about Ray Bourque's "hidden" ability are not correct :)

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That's the odd thing for me, I can't score 3-5 slapshot goals per game with Roenick and Ciccarelli despite their shot ratings :o

It could be because they are right handed and maybe I gravitate more naturally to left handed shooters with my slapshot style. However, if someone posts up an SNES NHL 94 video where they can score 3 or more slapshot goals in a 5 min, no offside game against the cpu, I will gladly admit that my theories about Ray Bourque's "hidden" ability are not correct :)

I've done it with St. Louis. They have 3 great shooters. Hull and Brown have the power and Shanahan the Accuracy. Well, of course it should be easier with Bourque since his shot is amazing (both power and acc). But other players can do it for sure. I use a slightly different technique compared to you btw. My video in the future will show it.

Anyway, the slapshots can be very useful vs other players since most people are not ready for it. They seem to think that I am going for a one timer or deke and activates the goalie. and that makes it easier for the slapshot to go in.

I prefer right handed shooters btw ;)

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That's the odd thing for me, I can't score 3-5 slapshot goals per game with Roenick and Ciccarelli despite their shot ratings :o

It could be because they are right handed and maybe I gravitate more naturally to left handed shooters with my slapshot style. However, if someone posts up an SNES NHL 94 video where they can score 3 or more slapshot goals in a 5 min, no offside game against the cpu, I will gladly admit that my theories about Ray Bourque's "hidden" ability are not correct :)

Maybe it's because a left handed shootert will usually shoot on the goalie's blocker side, which might be easier to score on. Try playing against Fuhr (catches with his right hand) and see what happens :).

Roenick and Cicc are faster, too, which may throw your angle off or make the timing more difficult?

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Maybe it's because a left handed shootert will usually shoot on the goalie's blocker side, which might be easier to score on. Try playing against Fuhr (catches with his right hand) and see what happens :).

Roenick and Cicc are faster, too, which may throw your angle off or make the timing more difficult?

Well, I mostly score with right handed players. I don't think it matters which side if you just execute the slapper right.

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control.jpg

L = left defenseman control

R = right defenseman control

u, l, r, d = up, left, right, down directional movement

X = goaltender control

Y = dive, stand up, hook, hold, vogue

A = stack pads, skate, check, shoot, kill

B = pass, player selection, poke check, steal, trip

s = line change

S = start, menu

Can you list which buttons have different actions when held? Are the only abilities on offense pass, shoot, stand up, and player selection?

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fixed.

L = left defenseman control

R = right defenseman control

u, l, r, d = up, left, right, down directional movement

X = goaltender control

Y = dive, stand up, flip toss, hook, hold, vogue

A = stack pads, skate, check, shoot, kill

B = pass, player selection, poke check, steal, trip

s = line change

S = start, menu

edit: A is pretty much the only one you'd hold longer than a tapping/pressing and I guess you could use all of Y's commands except goalie dive on offense and you could call for a line change, too. most regular skater actions that are usually defensive can be done on offense without the puck, so nearly everything can be done in rare offensive situations, but with the puck, not as many.

Edited by trudatman

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Whenever I push X and try to defend against a break, my goalie keeps going behind the net like he's fielding an invisible puck. How do you control your defender direction and the goalie at the same time?

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Whenever I push X and try to defend against a break, my goalie keeps going behind the net like he's fielding an invisible puck. How do you control your defender direction and the goalie at the same time?

If I understand this correctly, you're trying to skate backwards with a defenseman AND control the goalie at the same time?

You can only control one player at a time :). So, if you are holding 'down' (skating your defender backwards towards your goal at the bottom of the screen) and you press X to become the goalie, then you will become the goalie, and he will skate down if you're still holding the down button, and the defender will no longer be under your control so will do whatever he wants to.

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Re: SLAP SHOTS

STEVE THOMAS is amazing at these. I think I get a slapper goal with him 1 of every 3 games I play the Islanders. Something about his shot is really hard on the AI goalie.

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this is an excellent thread and it should be expanded as much as possible. thanks for the great discussion, duders. add to it, y'all!

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What to do when being held

Look to pass it off. Most of the time you will lose the puck if you hope to break free but getting a pass off before you get knocked down is a good way to salvage the situation.

Alright advanced tactics:

When being held you can also spam check whos holding you to knock em down and keep going. IM sure player weight and checking is the factor as to whether this will be successful or not. You can anticipate the grab and ram them over right before/as being grabbed without the puck.

Now for the real tactic: If you swing the momentum of your player in the exact OPPOSITE direction a hit is coming from, on the moment of contact ,you can do a little bounce off the player and negate the hit. I especially used to do this with light players vs heavy.

and people be wondering why their players cant hit xD

Edited by shaftman

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Now for the real tactic: If you swing the momentum of your player in the exact OPPOSITE direction a hit is coming from, on the moment of contact ,you can do a little bounce off the player and negate the hit. I especially used to do this with light players vs heavy.

Yeah, this works really well. It doesn't ALWAYS work, but I'd say it's a huge chunk of the time that it does.

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