angryjay93

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Everything posted by angryjay93

  1. angryjay93

    Et Tu Brute Deuce SET YOUR LINES ASAP

    Gretzky-robi-granato Gretzky-granato-kamensky Granato-gretzky-kamensky Extra: kamensky Murphy-blake Sweeney-rouse Moog Fiset
  2. angryjay93

    Florida Panthers

    Florida Panthers Team Overview: Despite being hampered with the worst offense in the game, Florida can keep things interesting by playing a close to the vest defensive game carried by Gord Murphy, Gord Hynes, and John Vanbiesbrouck. No matter how good the defense performs, this pathetic core of forwards still has to squeeze some offense out, something they typically don't do. Forwards: Things are really rough for the Panthers when it comes to scratching out some offense. To further compound problems, the Panthers forwards don't excel defensively either. Forwards are typically the most important ingredient to a successful team, the Panthers can quickly become the worst team in the game if the forwards provide nothing. The Cone Line: Lomakin-Skrudland-Hough Andrei Lomakin: 7 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/3 shot, 3 sth, 4 pass, 3/2 aware, Shoots: L When looking for offense, Lomakin is the man to look to, try not to look for too much offense though because disappointment will follow otherwise. Stunningly enough, Lomakin is the fastest player among the forwards, so it is very tempting to put him in the middle for some one-on-one action. That would be a major mistake though as Lomakin isn't suited to deal with the heavy traffic of the slot on his own and having abysmal speed in the wings will only allow Lomakin to be focused on more easily. While it may be a futile battle in many instances, the best way to utilize Lomakin is to put his plus passing skills to work by creating space on the outside in the offensive zone and then feeding an open shooter. Thankfully Lomakin has an average shot so he can also try to keep the goalie honest when he has the puck, but his lack of pure sniping ability and skating only makes him so useful as a goal scorer. Brian Skrudland: 8 weight, 4/2 skating, 2/3 shot, 3 sth & pass, 2/4 aware, Shoots: L Without a doubt, Skrudland is the worst starting center in the league. A lack of speed, shooting ability, weight advantage, and offensive awareness renders Skrudland ineffective more often than not. What makes Skrudland the best center option though is he is the most likely player to finish a rare one-timing chance and he might be able to make a move on an over aggressive defense as his agility can be helpful in that regard. Skrudland and Lomakin is as meager of a 1-2 punch as there is in the league, try to get out to a quick start and let Skrudland do what he does best from there, a slow, grinding, poke checking game. Mike Hough: 7 weight, 3/2 skating, 3/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L It was unavoidable, but Hough is the best 2 speed wing option on the Panthers, a fate no other team in the league is forced to deal with. There really isn't a thing special about Hough, he's a middle weight with sub-par skating and shooting skills. The offense shouldn't be flowing through Hough, but at times it must in order to change things up. He is a competent passer and perhaps the Panthers can work a quick passing combination from time to time to create a chance since they can pass the biscuit a bit. Defensively, Hough will have trouble, even with heavyweights since his porous skating will make it difficult for him to get into good checking position. This line is in for a rough ride, chances will be far and few between and the unit isn't fast or light enough to be a force defensively. It is going to take a lot of skill and patience to be able to work the puck up the ice and get close enough to create a scoring chance which will likely be blown with their awful shooting. Bum Rush Malaise: Lomakin-Skrudland-Belanger Jesse Belanger: 4 weight, 1/2 skating, 2/2 shot, 2 sth & pass, 3/1 aware, Shoots: L There isn't a whole lot of good that can be said about Belanger other than he is one light mofo. Despite his ability to knock down the opposition, he is still going to bleed chances against because every attribute on Belanger is below average. Certain users do excel with even the most extreme of weight buggers though, so at least Belanger is worth that. On a team with so little talent, he is worth a look. Hough likely wasn't going to produce much offense, icing Belanger probably wont kill the attack that much more. If he can get involved on defense, it gives the Panthers 2 flyweight options, which no other team can compare with despite their horrible skating. Getting more than 3-4 goals out of this group though is the stuff of legend. Other Options: Penalties and injuries are bound to happen; we may as well know what we're going to have to deal with when those situations arise. Dave Lowry: 8 weight, 2/2 skating, 2/2 shot, 2 sth & pass, 2/3 aware, Shoots: L Looks exciting doesn't it? Lowry won't be doing a whole a lot of damage except to your own team on the scoreboard. Tom Fitzgerald: 8 weight, 2/2 skating, 2/2 shot, 2 sth & pass, 2/3 aware, Shoots: R A right handed of version of Dave Lowry? Just what I've always wanted! Scott Mellanby: 9 weight, 1/1 weight, 3/3 shot, 2 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: R That speed has to be a typo right? Nope, the best sniper on the team has 1/1 skating and 9 weight. Try to contain yourself. Forwards: .5/10 Defense: Man, that forwards section was just downright ugly. Things get better here, I promise. Gord Murphy is a solid blue line option. Mobility! Huzzah! Hynes can throw his weight around if nothing else and the depth isn't league worst. Hynes-Murphy Gord Hynes: 4 weight, 2/2 skating, 1/2 shot, 2 sth & pass, 2/2 aware, Shoots: L This is extremely similar to what we saw with Belanger, but a defenseman has a little easier time getting away with such a pathetic skating and skill set since they aren't being asked to cover as much ice or score the puck. In his best games, Hynes with his monster checking ability in user mode can make the opponent adjust their game plan or face the consequences of numerous turnovers. Only Don Sweeney is an equal to Hynes body checking ability for defenders, but Hynes takes a bit more know how since his lack of skating makes him a bit harder to handle. Hynes can handle a body check when carrying the puck, but don't get too carried away with him, an experienced player will quickly poke check him and start the counter with the best defender on his keyster. Gord Murphy: 8 weight, 5/4 skating, 4/1 shot, 3 sth & pass, 2/3 aware, Shoots: R If Gordon gets hurt, tell the fat lady to get going because the game is as good as over. I know, you might be saying that Gord is at best a #2 d-man on a good team, but we need him to be the man. Welcome to Florida Panther hockey! Murphy brings a refreshing amount of speed and shot power to a roster that can't match him in either category. It is a well known fact that Murphy will have to be used on offense in most situations, so don't be afraid to use him in that regard. Defensively Murphy is fairly standard, not a great body checker, using Murphy's speed and a sound poke check is the key to success. Fairly dopey in AI mode, it is probably best to use Murphy personally as much as possible because he is the most legitimate player the Panthers have in user control. This is a huge upgrade from the Panther forwards, getting everything possible out of the defense is the key to success here. Murphy and Hynes provide a classic offensive and defensive defenseman combo as both of them have their roles clearly in place. Murphy-Richer Stephane Richer: 9 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/2 shot, 3 sth, 2 pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: R It is unclear why Richer received such steady ratings as his NHL career didn't amount much more to than a cup of coffee, but I won't complain. Hynes has the tendency to go MOFAPE! on defense or get blown away by faster forwards. Richer might be able to help remedy the problem as he has a bit more mobility to his game. Aside from that, Richer is a standard option that is comparable to Garth Butcher in St. Louis and Doug Lidster in Vancouver. Richer fits the mold of a defensive defenseman by the most basic terms and thus allows Murphy to wheel and deal on offense. It's just going to take great poke checking and holding ability to turn Richer into a defensive stopper. Other Options: Sometimes going more than 3 deep is necessary, at least mobility is still an option. Milan Tichy: 8 weight, 3/2 skating, 2/1 shot, 2 sth & pass, 1/1 aware, Shoots: L Pitiful awareness, but everything else is manageable in a pinch. Joe Cirella: 10 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/2 shot, 2 sth & pass, 2/2 aware, Shoots: R Default starter, pretty tough to start a heavy weight with weak passing skills. But average skating might be able to make up for those weaknesses in spot duty. Defense: 5.5/10 Goalie Zone: The lone expansion team with an average goalie, the Panthers shouldn't get run out of the building because their goaltender faulted them. John Vanbiesbrouck: 5 weight, 3/4 skating, 5/5 aware, 3 puck control, 3/4/3/4 save, Catches: L Beezer further solidifies the defense for the Panthers with goaltending that is on par with league average. But he will need support as he isn't capable of carrying the Panthers to success on his own. Goalies: 5.5/10 Bottom Line: Ignore the forwards for a moment and the Panthers look like most any other team in the league. If anything...ANYTHING!!! can be provided by the forwards the Panthers can compete. It's just too bad that forwards are the most important position in '94 and the Panthers tend to get their heads handed to them because of it.
  3. angryjay93

    Florida Panthers

  4. angryjay93

    Et Tu Bruce Deuce: Team Selections

    I'll just stick with classic 94 sharks stuff. No changes needed. Thank for doing this for us raph.
  5. angryjay93

    New York Rangers

    New York Rangers Team Overview: After a very disappointing 1992-93 season, the Rangers were affected by multiple adverse adjustments to their roster from NHL ’93 to NHL’ 94. What’s left is a top heavy roster that is negatively affected by the weight bug. Not all is lost though, Mike Gartner is a border line top 10 player and Brian Leetch is a serviceable #1 D-man, these two players allow the Rangers to be a respectable squad. Forwards: Aside from the previously mentioned Gartner, the Rangers forwards are very average, they also don’t necessarily compliment each other well which further compounds the issue of constructing a solid line. While many of the substitutes are light, they aren’t big hitters, pair that with a sheer inability to score the puck consistently up and down the roster and the Ranger forwards have an uphill battle on both sides of the rink. Feed the ‘Stache: Tikkanen-Gartner-Messier Esa Tikkanen: 9 weight, 5/5 skating, 4/2 shot, 4 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: L With his enticing 5 speed, Tikkanen typically always finds a use in the line-up despite being rather heavy, especially for a winger. Often times though, his speedy presence can come at a very frustrating cost. The biggest culprit of this is his poor shot rating. Even after making a beautiful deke or receiving an easy one-timer, Tikkanen is well renowned for his ability to miss the yawning cage...consistently. Oddly enough for a heavyweight, Tikkanen is best suited as a puck carrying set-up man. He has the speed and elusiveness to give the defense fits and he can easily keep pace with Gartner to feed him for some offensive chances. One of the disadvantages of being fast and heavy though is that it may be tough to line up a poke check at such a high speed. If Tikkanen is struggling with his goal-scoring and defense, he becomes a liability, especially if he’s getting pushed around in addition. Don’t be afraid to sub him out if this occurs, his strengths don’t make him immune to a benching. Mike Gartner: 7 weight, 5/5 skating, 5/3 shot, 5 sth & pass, 4/4 aware, Shoots: R No doubt Gartner is an enjoyable player to use, but to steal a term from baseball, he is wildly effective. Along with Mike Modano, Gartner probably leads the league in stupefying moments where the user is left saying “I can’t believe he missed that!” or “Only Gartner baby, only Gartner!” A unique combo of speed and shot power, Gartner is about as effective from 5 feet from the goal as he is 50 feet. Gartner is an extremely gifted one-on-one player, although a bit heavy, his cannon like shot power adds another element to his game that most players don’t possess. Also gifted with a great play-making skill set, it will likely fall by the way side since the Rangers have no one worth putting at center. The attack will eventually lead towards getting Gartner the puck and letting him do his magic. While not a big hitter, Garter does have the speed to get involved on the fore check or back check to try and work the poke check. The more turnovers and counter attacks he creates, the more opportunities he has to use his speed to wreak havoc. Mark Messier: 10 weight, 5/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 5 sth & 5 pass, 4/4 aware, Shoots: L Aside from Eric Lindros and Cam Neely, no other player in the league may have as much trouble matching performance with overall rating then Mark Messier. Sublimely skilled (if shooting is ignored), Messier would suggest to project as one of the elite playmakers in the league. Alas, using Messier as a playmaker is akin to playing chicken, tempting fate and nearing closer and closer to the edge of the cliff, deciding when to move the puck with Messier is always a dangerous game. Icing Messier though is the lesser of many evils, while Messier doesn’t bring anything unique to this line, other than his wretched defense, he is capable of making a quick give and go pass to Gartner to spring him into space. Just don’t ask Messier to score, getting him near the net is nearly impossible and he has no ability to score from range. No need to fall off that cliff. While an extremely mobile line that is gifted at moving the puck, it is held back immensely by its severe weight disadvantage and lack of finishing touch. For the most part, the offense is all about feeding Gartner at some point and letting him light the lamp because Tikkanen and Messier are so inept at doing it themselves. Defensively, using the mobility of the line is key, keeping the opponent to the outside and attempting to use the poke check should be the main goal. Feed the ‘Stache 2: Tikkanen-Gartner-Amonte Tony Amonte: 6 weight, 4/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 3 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: R Amonte is arguably the best of a bunch of light weight players with plus skating and mediocre skills, but that isn’t meant to be much of a compliment. Despite never garnering starter consideration in the GDL, Amonte still finds a use on the Rangers because he brings a more defensive presence then Messier which allows Tikkanen to be the main playmaker. Amonte lacks both finishing and creative skills, but he is quick and light which will hopefully limit the amount of turnovers he commits. Trading in a little playmaking skill for some defensive prowess may be a wise decision because Messier isn’t exactly adept at getting to the prime offensive areas in which to create offense for Gartner. The end game is the same though, get the puck to Gartner and let him do something amazing. Are we sensing a theme yet?: Turcotte-Gartner-Amonte Darren Turcotte: 6 weight, 4/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 4 sth, 3 pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L If one Amonte wasn’t enough, here’s a second winger just like him to accompany Gartner. I feel compelled to copy and paste what I wrote for Amonte and insert Turcotte’s name where needed. I’m trying to be a credible author here though, so this is what I have to say about Turcotte. While Turcotte isn’t Amonte, he isn’t not Amonte, do you follow? What we’ve done here is turned a fast, skilled, heavy line into a less fast, less skilled, less heavy line. It’s probably a useful line when playing light weight teams such as Detroit, Vancouver or Boston, but aside from Gartner, there just isn’t enough skill being iced to truly compete with the opponent unless the Rangers play out of their mind. Again, on offense the idea is the same, get the puck to Gartner. Again, and again, and again, and again... Other Options: Turcotte and Amonte are ok players who can at least skate a fair bit and not got mangled. What lies below is a ragged collection of guys who will get mangled but are more skilled, or won’t get mangled, yet are somehow less spectacular. Adam Graves: 6 weight, 4/4 skating, 2/3 shot, 3 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L Typically good for a 4th or 5th forward spot on a GDL roster, Graves fittingly enough is the 5th or so best forward for the Rangers. Read what I wrote for Turcotte and Amonte, then insert a puny shot which is compensated by no other skill. For the truly masochistic, run Turcotte, Amonte, and Graves out on the same line. That ought to be fun. Ed Olczyk: 9 weight, 4/3 skating, 4/3 shot, 4 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L If Ed had a bit more speed he’d be somewhat useful with his plus skill set. What the reality is though is a guy who doesn’t really set up all that well in the offensive zone and will have issues getting his shot off because why would you try to feed Olczyk when the puck is already on the stick of Gartner? Alexei Kovalev: 7 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/4 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L This version of the AK plays a bit more like a single action revolver in the hands of a noob. A bit slow, cumbersome to use, and lacking shot power or a threat from range, AK is a desperation option at center if the user strongly desires to put Gartner out on the wing. Sergei Nemchinov: 6 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/4 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/5 aware, Shoots: L Slow moving, defensive minded forwards don’t have much place in ’94, especially if they aren’t a super light-weight. Useful in the 5th or 6th forward slot for the GDL, but only if he doesn’t get playing time. Forwards: 6/10 (3/10 if Gartner is hurt or in the box) Defense: Much like the forwards, Leetch is a very solid #1 option, he is supported by a skilled heavyweight and then a few solid yet unspectacular options. Patrick-Leetch Brian Leetch: 6 weight, 6/3 skating, 4/1 shot, 5 sth & pass, 4/4 aware, Shoots: L Comfortably among the top 10 defenders in the league, Leetch provides a lot of positive attributes to the team, but he lacks the one dominant skill that the premier players typically possess. While having only average speed, Leetch is surprisingly fast due in large part to his perfect agility and light weight which allows him to accelerate quickly and turn on a dime. This asset is useful not only on offense, but defense as well in that he is very easy to use and has the checking power to bring down some mid-heavy weights. Offensively, its pretty tempting to try and get Leetch involved because he is a far better puck carrier than Tikkanen or Messier, but his lack of shot accuracy hampers his finishing ability and his passing can sometimes be a hindrance, especially in close because he passes the puck so hard, the receiver has a tendency to have the puck bounce off their stick. Overall though, don’t be too afraid to integrate Leetch in the offense, just remember he is the one covering Messier, which leaves the right side of the ice extremely vulnerable if Leetch gets wiped out. James Patrick: 9 weight, 4/4 skating, 4/1 shot, 4 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: R A solid #2 option, Patrick has all the skills that we can ask for a player in his position...except for his weight. On a team with some major checking presence, having Patrick on the ice wouldn’t be as big of a deal as he could be compensated by his teammates thus allowing his skating and puck skills to shine. On the Rangers though, Patrick is just another strong skating heavy weight who seems to constantly be playing a game of hot potato until the puck gets on Gartner’s stick. If Patrick can manage to play some solid defense and use his speed to run down some breakaways, he becomes a very useful option. A highly skilled duo, Patrick and Leetch will not look uncomfortable with the puck. They just do not get the help they need in terms of a physical presence from the forwards that would make them a highly regarded pairing. Zubov-Leetch Sergei Zubov: 7 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: R Nothing about Zubov stands out and makes him extremely useful. He is merely mentioned because he is the lightest option aside from Leetch and his skill set isn’t crippling. If Zubov can sit back in his own zone and play a steady game by covering up the slot and not committing turnovers with the puck, he’s doing his job. This could be a useful pairing against a heavy team such as Pittsburgh or one with a slug in the middle such as New Jersey, NYI, or St. Louis for example because Zubov then becomes a body checking presence. If Zubov is sitting back in the zone, then it gives Leetch a bit more leeway on offense and not too much skill is lost with the benching of Patrick. Other Option: Only one other guy is worth icing, the Rangers are hampered with fat and unskilled d-men on the bottom half of their depth chart. Kevin Lowe: 8 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/1 shot, 4 sth, 3 pass, 2/4 aware, Shoots: L A very heady player, Lowe has found himself some occasional starting duty in the GDL because he stays in his own zone, can move the puck around a bit, and is a decent skater. If Lowe stays within himself, he’s fairly effective, just don’t try to wheel and deal with him. Defense: 6.5/10 Goalie Zone: Aside from Boston, no other team provides a pair of worthwhile goalies that should garner equal consideration as a starter. Much like Boston though, neither option is elite, they are merely league average at best. Mike Richter: 7 weight, 3/4 skating, 4/4 aware, 3 puck control, 4/4/4/4 save, Catches: L While Richter may have the superior save ratings, he has some issues getting to the puck, even in manual goalie. Richter is a bit on the heavy side for a goalie and his lack of agility makes his first move sluggish which can be the difference between a save and a goal. Richter is very rarely in the top portion statistically of most leagues, don’t feel compelled to make a reach for him in the draft. John Vanbiesbrouck: 5 weight, 3/4 skating, 5/5 aware, 3 puck control, 3/4/3/4 save, Catches: L Vanbiesbrouck is by no means a great goalie either, but he’s a bit easier to move around the crease which makes him the more effective goalie of the two despite slightly downgraded save ratings. Sure, his overall is pumped up by high awareness, he, unlike Richter though, is not unfamiliar with the upper end of the goalie statistics on occasion. Most users typically tend to lean towards using Beezer, don’t be afraid to play a hunch though as both are fairly similar. The Rangers could be a lot tougher with a solid goalie in net, but that just isn’t the case. Goalie: 5.5/10 Bottom Line: When taking a close look at the Rangers, it becomes noticeable that they are similar to the Penguins due to their heavy lineup and lack of scoring touch. What sets the Rangers apart though is their speed, a top 10 player in Gartner and a solid, light defenseman in Leetch. If Gartner can shake loose and be a force the Rangers play pretty well, but the opposite typically provides a very ugly result.
  6. angryjay93

    New York Rangers

  7. angryjay93

    Philadelphia Flyers

    Philadelphia Flyers Team Overview: Although lacking an elite super star and a solid #1 defenseman, the Flyers do have some very nice pieces in place to construct a solid line that can take on a couple different looks. These two different looks include a solid offensive approach where elite shooters such as Eric Lindros and Mark Recchi make defenses respect all areas of the ice. The other is an approach built on the speed and checking of Pelle Eklund and Kevin Dineen. The user must recognize their own strengths and weaknesses and evaluate the matchup at hand in order to determine the appropriate line combination. Forwards: The forward unit is where the identity of the Flyers will be made, their defense has only one option, which makes constructing the forward line all the more important. There are 4 useful forwards; Recchi, Eklund, Lindros, and Dineen. The first two are mainstays and should be included in any line combination, picking one of the last 2 is where the true identity of the team is made. Balanced Attack: Lindros-Recchi-Eklund Eric Lindros: 12 weight, 4/3 skating, 4/6 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/4 aware, Shoots: R This is the slower of the two lines I will recommend, it is very tempting to insert Lindros in the middle because of his 4/6 shot being among the elite in the game. Doing so though, would put the Flyers in a very precarious spot in terms of team speed and defense. At 4 agi/ 3 spd and 11 weight, Lindros is very slow and rather sluggish to handle, not only is he a liability defensively, he has issues dancing through traffic due to his handling and weight. He will be more useful on his off wing, he is an effective passer and stickhandler, also he can use his 4/6 shot to shoot accurate slap shot bombs from just inside the blueline. Mark Recchi: 6 weight, 5/4 skating, 4/5 shot, 4 sth & pass, 5/3 aware, Shoots: L Recchi is just on the outside looking in of the truly elite 94 players. At 6 weight, Recchi is the ideal center package, he has 5 o aware, so he will make a home in the slot to unleash his dangerous 4/5 shot via the one timer. He is also a slick enough skater at 5/4 to be a very dangerous 1 on 1 slasher through the middle of the ice. He can turn on a dime and is light enough to withstand checks from all but the most elite checkers. Another great thing about Recchi is that he has 4 passing ability, if the defense focuses too much on Recchi, he can make a deft pass over to Lindros who can then one time one of his own lethal shots at the net which creates a very solid 1-2 punch up front. Pelle Eklund: 5 weight, 5/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L Eklund is the defensive specialist of the line, but lets not undersell his ability to play a role on offense. He is also a nimble skater at 5/4, and with his 5 weight, he can run down and effectively check many of the top snipers in the game. He is also a great forechecker, Recchi is no slouch on defense, this allows Eklund to occasionally press the action in the offensive zone in an effort to lock down the other team behind their own blueline, creating turnovers with Eklund allows him to use his 4 passing to dish the puck to the open man. While only a 3/3 shooter, Eklund is not a complete liability when putting the puck on net, he can be counted on for some solid dekes. This is the most balanced line possible, Lindros and Recchi provide two legitimate goal scorers to keep the defense on their toes. The defensive ability of Recchi in the middle and Eklund on the right can more than make up for Lindros’s short comings due to their light weight and skating skills. Constant Pressure: Eklund-Recchi-Dineen Putting Eklund on his natural side makes him a much more effective player, he can now deke on his forehand to the short side, and he can also use his puck skills to drag the puck through the middle and pull of a sweet little floater to the far side. Also he can now use his more effective forehand pass to feed the puck to a left handed Recchi for quick, effective one-timers. Kevin Dineen: 7 weight, 4/5 skating, 2/3 shot 3 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: R Dineen has one attribute and one attribute only, his skating. A 4/5 skater, he has the ability to push the play on the wings and come back effectively on defense. Although at 7 weight, coupled with his meager puck skills, he is not a defensive stalwart nor an offensive weapon. The main draw to Dineen is that he keeps Lindros and his fat man self off the ice, if you can accept Dineen for what he is, then all the power to you. With three plus skaters at weights of 5-6-7, this line can skate with any team in the league. The only problem is that it becomes more of a one man scoring situation with Recchi being the only respectable scorer. Depite that problem though, this is still a very effective line that can put constant pressure on the other team with their speed, by creating mistakes, easier scoring chances should be created where guys of lesser skill such as Dineen and Eklund can pot in the odd goal. Other Options: Rod Brind'Amour: 9 weight, 4/3 skating, 4/4 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/4 awareness, Shoots: L The Bod has a nice skill set here, and he can play center in a pinch if need be, but its hard to ask him to be a consistent contributor. Its really tough keeping up with the pace of a game with only 3 speed, its nearly impossible to do so while saddled down with 9 weight as well. Andrei Lomakin: 7 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/3 shot, 3 sth, 4 pass, 3/2 aware, Shoots: L A bit easier to handle and with more of an offensive nose, Lomakin could make a nice addition to the forward unit in Philly since he's a role player as opposed to being the superstar in Florida. Keith Acton: 4 weight, 2/2 skating, 3/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 2/4 aware, Shoots: L If in desperate need of weight bug whoring, look no further then "Tough Acton Tinactin." He'll eliminate the opposing team and Philly's offensive output. Forward Rating: (7/10) Defense: A ho-hum group of defenseman reside in Philly, even the top two options provide nothing elite to the table, all that can be asked for is a steady performance that doesn’t drown the team. Yushkevich-Hawgood Dmitri Yushkevich: 7 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/1 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: L Greg Hawgood: 7 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L These two are nearly identical players, both are 4/3 skaters with a 3 shot power, 3 stick handle and 3 passing. The only noticable difference is Yushkevich’s 4 d aware, which makes him the better option at left defense since both players are left handed. Neither is an offensive force, so there is no point in pushing the action with them in the offensive zone. In fact, they need to be kept as defensive minded as possible since both have mediocre speed, they will be unable to effectively chase down the faster players in the league. Other Options: Gord Hynes: 4 weight, 2/2 skating, 1/2 shot, 2 sth & pass, 2/2 aware, Shoots: L Gord Hynes provides a flyweight option that can lay the lumber, but his 2/2 skating leaves a slow blueline even more susceptible to the breakaway chance. Gary Galley: 7 weight, 2/2 skating, 2/1 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: L It's tough to recommend Galley with him being such a slug. But he does have some decent passing and awareness skills. Hopefully he stays home and puts them to use, but don't plan on it and hope he stays glued to the bench once you sub him out. Defense Rating: (4/10) Goalie Zone: Tommy Soderstrom: 3 weight, 4/4 skating, 4 puck control, 3/4/3/4 save, Catches: L Tommy Soderstrom is a solid goalie, but at 3 weight, he is vulnerable to the goal ram tactic, the flip side of this though, is that at 4/4 skating, he can fly around the crease and close the door on one timers and be an effective manual goalie. Dominic Roussel: 6 weight, 3/3 skating, 3 puck control, 3/3/2/2 save, Catches: L Every once in a while someone gets the bright idea that they can use Roussel in a time share in the GDL. I speak from personal experience here, don't be that guy with the bright idea. The only bright thing will be the red light behind Roussel. Goalie Rating: (7/10) The Final Word: While not an elite team, the Flyers can really cobble together a couple of very solid forward lines. Between the forward line, Soderstrom in net, and a conservative approach with the blue line, this team is quite the sleeper option.
  8. angryjay93

    Philadelphia Flyers

  9. angryjay93

    Blue Angels

    Awesome coach, I know you have been excited about this for month so it's really cool to see it happen!
  10. angryjay93

    New Jersey Devils

    New Jersey Devils Team Overview: If the Devils were removed from the game, I don’t think many people would notice. If there is a more non-descript team in the game, I’d like to know because no one receives less fan fare than the Devils. Aside from puck pounding center Stephane Richer, the Devils have plenty of average players that aren’t particularly noteworthy or fun to use. Forwards: While somewhat effective, the Devils forward group is rather ho-hum. Aside from Richer’s shot power, no other forward possesses an elite skill. In fact, all Devils forwards are flawed, and they don’t necessarily offset each others weaknesses very well. From Russia with Love: Zelepukin-Richer-Semak Valeri Zelepukin: 6 weight, 4/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L Zelepukin is a steady complimentary forward and he is allowed to play to that role on the Devils. Zelepukin is the only light weight player on the roster who has plus skating and thusly he will be carrying the puck up the ice the majority of the time. While a solid playmaker, Zelepukin isn’t a dangerous enough scorer or skater to really take the Devils offense to the next level. Score goals he must though as Richer doesn’t score consistently enough to carry the Devils to victory. Zelepukin is also the main defensive force here being the strongest skater and lightest option on the line. A lot is being asked of Valeri, he needs to deliver. Stephane Richer: 9 weight, 4/4 skating, 5/3 shot, 4 sth, 3 pas, 4/3 aware, Shoots: R It is likely that Richer will help the Devils as much as he will hurt them. This is essentially the commentary on building a line for the Devils, it’s about trying to use players who won’t kill the team. It’s tough to call Richer a sniper, since he doesn’t do a good job at sniping; he still remains interesting to watch as his thunderous one-timers are unpredictable. Richer isn’t great going one on one or at moving the puck, but he does have enough speed to take advantage of a lazy defense and can make some easy feeds to the open winger if need be. Richer gives you what you’d expect from a slug, bad defense that will induce many headaches. Alexander Semak: 6 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/4 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/4 aware, Shoots: R A steady playmaker, Semak can do some damage on offense if given time and space to operate in. Often times though, in a fast paced game, Semak becomes a forgotten man as his lack of speed can hinder his ability to affect a game positively. If puck possession can be established, Semak becomes a surprisingly opportunistic goal scorer as he is a more skilled finisher than his shooting ratings would suggest. Hopefully, Semak has more good games than bad games in AI mode because his awareness in both zones can help offset his lack of skating, if not it’ll be a long game for Semak despite his light weight and playmaking skills. This line won’t be confused among the elite, but it has its strengths. The wings are both light and skilled with the puck, they should be able to feed Richer often enough to give the Devils a chance to keep up. The question though is how often can the wings score and cover for Richer on defense, if that question goes unanswered, this line suffers. The Suckbags: Zelepukin-Semak-Nicholls Bernie Nicholls: 6 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/2 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: R Nicholls provides a similar game to Semak, just with less scoring ability. The lack of skating and shooting can provide cause for concern, but by playing on his forehand side, he can use his passing and dekeing skills to full effect here and attempt to create some space in the offensive zone for the rest of the line. Nicholls is by no means a special player, but he should be able to compliment this line adequately enough to warrant starting him. This line is pretty slow, but it is light and skilled. Puck possession is key here as well as precision passing. The offense is limited to anything from inside the face off circles; penetration into the offensive zone is going to be crucial as the lack of shot power doesn’t allow the Devils to stretch the offense. Defensively, Richer won’t be a liability anymore, but Semak and Nicholls lack of speed could become one against Vancouver and Dallas type teams. Other Options: These guys might get lucky to be a 5th or 6th forward in a GDL league as they are more heavily flawed then the previously mentioned players. Peter Stastny: 9 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/4 shot, 4 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: L A bit too slow and heavy to be a starter, Stastny can fill in on the right wing and provide some playmaking skills if one of the starting wingers get hurt. A spot start might not be out of the question either, but there are simply too many teams that can take advantage of Stastny for him to be a good player in the league. Bobby Holik: 10 weight, 3/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: R A standard option on the right, Holik brings a little extra speed at the cost of a whole lot of weight. Still, if the forward ranks get thinned out during a game, he can come in and be a more effective player than most of the other guys on the roster. Claude Lemieux: 11 weight, 4/4 skating, 4/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: R Despite being a default starter, Lemieux doesn’t have a whole lot of business doing so. Extremely heavy for a forward, Lemieux will easily be taken advantage of no matter the match-up. Combine that with average passing and an inaccurate shot, Claude becomes a last resort option off the bench at center. John MacLean: 9 weight, 3/3 skating, 4/3 shot, 3 sth, 2 pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: R Ed Olcyzk without the passing, MacLean might be a more reasonable center option than Lemieux as his shot is better and he might be a little easier to handle despite the downgraded skating statistics. Ideally though, MacLean nor Lemieux ever have to touch the ice. Forwards: 5/10 Defense: If you were hoping for something different from the forwards, you will be disappointed as the defense is also populated by a decently skilled light weight and crippling heavy players that don’t have enough skill to be very useful. Driver-Stevens Bruce Driver: 6 weight, 3/3 skating, 2/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: L Driver falls into a group of standard light weight defenseman such as Alexei Gusarov, Mark Howe, Todd Gill, and Norm MacIver. Driver much like Zelepukin though must play over his head in order to guide the Devils to success as he is being asked to do more than he ought to be expected of. Excelling as a stay at home defenseman, Driver can assert himself physically or via the poke check if need be. He can struggle against Selanne, Mogilny, and Bure, but there aren’t too many defensemen adept at handling them one on one to begin with. Not a gifted goal scorer by any means, Driver is still capable of driving a play into the attacking zone, making a move and dishing the puck off often enough to chip in his fair share of assists over the long haul. It’s wise to not get over aggressive with Driver though as his partners aren’t usually able to handle a counter attack on their own. Scott Stevens: 11 weight, 4/4 skating, 4/2 shot, 4 sth & pass, 3/4 aware, Shoots: L A glorious checker and crease stuffer in AI mode, Stevens really takes a turn for the worse when under user control. Thanks to his massive weight, Stevens in open ice is reduced to holding and poke checking which puts him at a distinct disadvantage, especially if he’s scrambling around. Stevens does have some good mobility and offensive skills, but his weight disadvantage makes him a borderline #2 defenseman in the best case scenario. Be careful handling the puck in the defensive zone with Stevens, he is a constant target out there and if he gets crushed, the best AI defender is now lost. A classic pairing in that couples a skilled heavyweight with an average lightweight; this pairing is going to have its share of ups and downs no matter what. Limiting mistakes and making effective passes though should cut down on how far the downs go. Driver-Niedermayer Scott Niedermayer: 9 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L Despite being a heavyweight, Niedermayer possesses all the minimum attributes to be a legitimate option on the blue line. Deciding between Stevens and Niedermayer is really a matter of preference though as there are clear trade offs to be made here. Niedermayer isn’t going to do anything spectacular; he’s going to be even blander than Driver. This pairing should help smooth out the highs and lows that can be experienced with the previous pairing. But a lack of speed on both sides of the ice leaves it prone to breakaways and counter attacks. Without a whole lot of help from the forwards, this defense could get lit up. Other Options: The Devils we’re a rather bruising team, they certainly had some big bodies back there, but that doesn’t bode well for NHL ’94. Alexei Kasatonov: 11 weight, 4/3 skating, 4/1 shot, 4 sth & pass, 2/3 aware, Shoots: L Despite being on a better team than in Anaheim, Kasatonov still isn’t adequately supported here to help cover up his weaknesses. Kasatonov can be a suitable sub for Stevens as he brings a similar set of skills although slightly downgraded and sans the aggressive AI mode. Slava Fetisov: 11 weight, 4/2 skating, 4/1 shot, 4 sth & pass, 2/4 aware, Shoots: L Another skilled super heavyweight, Fetisov is really tough to ice because he is painfully slow and his lack of acceleration only further exacerbates the problem. He can do the job as a 4th defenseman in the GDL, but decisions must be made quickly when the puck is on his stick. Defense: 4.5/10 Goalie Zone: Fortunately, the Devils aren’t devastated by awful goaltending, but they don’t get the superior goaltending they would need to be a competitive team. Chris Terreri: 2 weight, 4/4 skating, 4/4 aware, 3 puck control, 3/3/3/3 save, Catches: L A great manual keeper, Terreri is more than capable of eating up a lot of space in his crease in a short amount of time. But he can give out some juicy rebounds as his save and puck control ratings are nothing to write home about. Also, beware of the ram tactic; Terreri can be easily abused by big, aggressive forwards. Goalies: 6/10 Bottom Line: There isn’t a whole lot that can be done to spice up the Devils, they are possibly the most vanilla team in the league and that is reflected by the fact that they are almost never selected in Gens classic league or exhibition games for that matter. Puck possession and a grinding game is where the Devils thrive most, not the most glamorous style for sure.
  11. angryjay93

    New Jersey Devils

  12. I'm sorry it took me so long to post this one but things just kept coming up. Also I forgot the change the matchup graphic...oops! I still hope everyone enjoys the action in these games none the less.
  13. angryjay93

    New York Islanders

  14. angryjay93

    New York Islanders

    New York Islanders Team Overview: One of the most overlooked and under used teams in the league, it is easy to forget that the Islanders do boast a nice 1-2-3 combo on the front line. To be fair though, the Isles are over looked for a good reason, their absolutely pathetic defenders and goalies. Make no mistake about it, this is not a team for newcomers, seasoned veterans only need apply, and it’d be wise to have a high tolerance for defensive ineptitude. Forwards: As mentioned earlier, the Isles have a nice trio of Pierre Turgeon, Benoit Hogue, and Steve Thomas. This is a very versatile line that can light the lamp. What the line lacks though is a true lightweight to throw his weight around and cause havoc. This wouldn’t be such a big deal if the defense wasn’t so heavy and slow, but that is the dilemma we are presented with. With that in mind, even with the lack of forward depth after the top 3, a substitute may be a wise play. The Franchise: Hogue-Turgeon-Thomas Benoit Hogue: 7 weight, 4/5 skating, 3/5 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L Despite not being among the top end 5+ speed skaters, Hogue is still responsible for being the main offensive weapon for the Islanders. Hogue really excels in open ice, he is a shifty forward who can leave slower defenders in his wake. Despite being something of a middle weight, Hogue is still perfectly capable of going 1 on 1 to drive to the net and create a deke opportunity, his supreme shot accuracy will only aid him in converting those chances into goals. Hogue can also play the role of set up man, he has a decent amount of puck skills to aid him in dishing the puck towards the middle to feed the opportunistic Pierre Turgeon. When it comes to defense, Hogue is very capable of shadowing opponents, but he’s a finesse defender in that he must use his poke check to be effective. Pierre Turgeon: 9 weight, 4/4 skating, 4/5 shot, 4 sth & pass, 5/3 aware, Shoots: L The prototypical goal scoring slug, Turgeon is an exceptional one timer option because he has a great knack for finding open space in the slot and then tickling the twine with his powerful, accurate shot. Remarkably though, Turgeon, despite his pristine shot ratings, can run a bit hot and cold, more than the average player it seems. When it comes to a slug like Turgeon, the defense and ability to carry the puck is the real worry here. While a decent skater, light weight teams can take advantage of him by closing off the middle of the ice and dominating him physically. Defensively, Turgeon is reduced to poke checking and holding, Steve Thomas: 6 weight, 4/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 3 sth, 4 pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L A solid, gritty, playmaking winger, Thomas doesn’t bring any jaw dropping skills to the table. That’s ok though, that’s what Turgeon and Hogue are for anyways. Thomas is a good complimentary 3rd forward because he can carry the puck up the ice effectively with solid skating skills and a fairly low weight to help him withstand body checks. Unlike other low weight, light shooting forwards on other soft teams in the game, Thomas is very adept at dishing the puck off effectively, which makes Turgeon’s one timing option that much more dangerous. He is also a solid 4 checker, meaning the idea of checking someone in AI mode is not a foreign concept. With a solid combination of speed, shooting, skating, and grit, this line is more than capable of putting a few goals up on even the best of teams. One thing to take into consideration is swapping Thomas for Turgeon on the penalty kill. The Isles have no weight advantage on defense, thus any advantage on the front line should be utilized to the fullest. Dale Hunter Special: Thomas-Hogue-Volek Dave Volek: 6 weight, 4/4 skating, 2/2 shot, 4 sth, 3 pass, 3/2 aware, Shoots: L As mentioned earlier, the Isles only weight advantage options are on the frontline, so in the right situation it might be wise to bench the supremely skilled Turgeon for the lighter, although far less skilled Volek. What makes Volek a viable option though is his light weight and his skating skills, he is the only other 4 speed player on the roster and thus allows him to keep up better with the offensive pace of Hogue. Volek should primarily be used as a defensive force and a playmaking forward because his slap shot is utterly pathetic and it won’t beat any goalie from range. Couple that with his low awareness and his inability to fill one-timing spots, it becomes a chore to try and make him a consistent scorer. Hogue’s speed and one-on-one ability brings a different sort of dynamic to the team that would obviously benefit a user that is more interested in dekeing from the middle than setting up one timers and using speed on the wings. While Thomas is on his natural wing now, thus making him a bit more effective in the goal scoring department, this line is still woefully light on slap shot options and shot power in general. It will take very precise efforts from in close to get goals from anyone not named Hogue. Other options: The Islanders lack a lot of top end depth. What they do have though is a handful of guys that might come in useful once in a blue moon and help fill out a depth chart late in a draft. Ray Ferraro: 6 weight, 3/3 skating, 4/3 shot, 4 sth, 3 pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L A poor man’s Joe Juneau, Ferraro is a man without a natural position. He doesn’t have the shot accuracy or awareness to be a center, nor does he have the skating or playmaking skills to be a productive winger. He is merely a light weight option who can sneak a slapper or quick deke by the goalie, but how often will he get that chance with such average skating? Derek King: 9 weight, 3/2 skating, 4/5 shot, 4 sth, 2 pass, 4/3 aware, shoots: L Built in the Rick Tocchet mold, King should never be on the ice at the same time as Turgeon, which makes him the ideal substitute if Turgeon gets hurt. A great shooter who is fairly decent at finding the open ice, he should be a solid option for one timers. Other than that though, King is a liability, hes slow, heavy, and a weak passer, if he ever has the puck on his stick for more than a split second, hes hurting the team. Marty McInnis: 4 weight, 3/3 skating, 2/3 shot, 3 sth, 2 pass, 3/2 aware, Shoots: R The lone pure weight bugger, McInnis can be effective in a hard hitting game, but even then, that might be stretching his limits. Possessing average speed and less than mediocre skills, McInnis will really hamper the offense, something that is a must have with such a weak defensive corps and goaltending. Forward Rating: 7/10 Defense: There isn’t much to like about the Islanders defense, its slow, heavy, and far too focused on offensive skills. Now for something positive to say about it...their sticks won’t break, likely not very helpful since they might not be using them much. Kasparitis-Kurvers Darius Kasparitis: 7 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/1 shot, 3 sth & pass, 2/3 aware, Shoot: L On a team with an average defense, Kasparitis would be nothing more than a #2 D-man option, ideally though he would be a #3 guy and the first option off the bench. On the Isles, he is the de-facto #1 guy. Sadly, Kasparitis doesn’t have a single elite skill, he’s a slightly above average skater, but everything else is merely average. It isn’t that he is necessarily a bad player, he just isn’t the top tier defensive stud that this team is in desperate need of. Try to avoid using Kasparitis on offensive rushes at all costs, he doesn’t have the skills to take advantage of such chances, he’s not fast enough to get back, and he’s the best d option, keep him back there. Tom Kurvers: 8 weight, 3/3 skating, 4/1 shot, 3 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L When one of the starters on defense isn’t a sure fire draft pick in the 12 round GDL draft, it’s a clear sign that a D-core is in major trouble. Kurvers is simply the lesser of many evils on the Isles depth chart. An average skating middle weight with 4 shot power, Kurvers is a very vanilla option. One unique thing about him though, is that he has an offensive awareness rating higher than his defensive rating, this is not a good thing. Kurvers has a tendency to get lost in all three zones when the Isles do not possess the puck. Trust me though, he is the second best defenseman on this team despite all these shortcomings. Kasparitis-Norton Jeff Norton: 8 weight, 3/3 skating, 2/2 shot, 2 sth, 3 pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L Look a little familiar? It should, Norton is exactly the same as Kurvers save for his shooting and stick handling. Inserting Norton into the lineup is beyond nothing more than personal preference as he and Kurvers are interchangeable. Other Option: Vladimir Malakhov: 10 weight, 3/3 skating, 4/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L Another 4/3 awareness? Yeah, it seems the Isles have a monopoly on these defenseman. If it weren’t for Malakhov’s massive weight and average skating, he could be a somewhat useful option. But in a league that is flooded with fleet footed, hard hitting forwards, icing Malakhov is just asking for trouble. In certain matchups, or in spot duty, Malakhov can tread water. These opportunities are few and far between though. Defense Rating: 3/10 Goalie Zone: Look, I know the defense section had to have been pretty depressing to read, but this has to be better right? Unfortunately, no, it isn’t any better here, in fact, it’s worse. How you ask? Keep reading. Glenn Healy: 5 weight, 2/4 skating, 4/4 aware, 2 puck control, 2/2/2/2 saves Mark Fitzpatrick: 7 weight, 2/4 skating, 2/2 aware, 3 puck control, 2/2/2/2 saves Healy has the higher overall rating (47 to 44), it is artificially pumped up by the useless awareness ratings though. Essentially the decision boils down to one thing. Have slightly better rebound control, or a slightly more mobile GC. For the former, go with Fitzpatrick, for the latter, go Healy. Once the decision is made though, goals are going to come in bunches either way. No non-expansion team comes close to the toxic waste that is the Isles goalie situation. Goalie Rating: 1.5/10 Bottom Line: After the top 3 forwards, the depth of the team falls off dramatically to expansion like levels. But it’s those 3 forwards that make the Isles much more dangerous than the expansion teams and hopefully it can keep the opponent honest in their game plan.
  15. angryjay93

    Washington Capitals

    Washington Capitals Team Overview: Aside from maligned superstar Peter Bondra, the Caps are a slow, heavy, and inadequately skilled squad that will wreak havoc on making effective line combos. In draft league formats, the Capitals do have some useful players to keep in mind to round out your squad, so don’t completely ignore this roster. Forwards: Creativity will be needed here to construct an effective line. Bondra is easily the best forward available, but his play style is so vastly different from the rest of the roster, that it will make it very hard to incorporate players such as Ridley, Khristich, or anyone else plugged in. Mish-Mash: Khristich-Bondra-Ridley Dimitri Khristich: 7 weight, 3/3 skating, 4/6 shot, 4/4 sth, 4/3 aware, Shoots: R Despite being wonderfully skilled, especially in shooting, Khristich is sort of a boat anchor that drags around the ice. On a regular team, Khristich’s average skating wouldn’t be such a big issue, but with Bondra flying around with reckless abandon, it’s going to be tough to keep Khristich involved. A one-on-one game isn’t ideal for Khristich either as he is a prime target for lightweight forwards to abuse on an aggressive back check. With that said, there aren’t too many better options available to put in over Khristich, when he gets his chances, he should be able to deposit them with consistency as he is a great one-time shooter and is money from inside the face off circles. Peter Bondra: 6 weight, 4/6 skating, 3/ 4 shot, 4 sth, 3 pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L As far as players with 6 speed go, Bondra is at the bottom of the food chain due to his lack of agility and subpar skillset when compared to guys like Selanne, Bure, and Mogilny. Bondra is the best chance at instant offence though, he is very tough to bring down in open ice and his speed should do more than enough damage to most defenses on its own. Bondra is a bit of a mixed bag on defense, fast enough to get involved in almost any defensive play, but not agile or light enough to be used as a true human wrecking ball or tactical defensive player. Mike Ridley: 9 weight, 4/4 skating, 3/4 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L A bona fide heavy weight, Ridley is a little under skilled to be consistent force on the ice, but he should be able to assert himself well enough in most instances. A pass first player, Ridley should be on the lookout for a streaking Bondra or for Khristich parking himself in a one-timer spot since his own shooting and skating abilities aren’t tailor made for goal scoring. Typically I don’t suggest that heavyweights be an option for puck handling, but Ridley really does have the best combination of skating skill and playmaking acumen to facilitate a more patient style of offense. Even if he does get knocked off the puck, he is the least able of the Capital forwards on defense, his loss won’t be greatly missed. This line is a clusterfuck, the skills of these players don’t necessarily complement each other well but it does the best job of putting these players in their most natural positions. Bondra can work the one on one game, it just takes a bit more skill and know how to do so then with a typical super speedster. Khristich can snipe and Ridley can distribute. It’s just a matter of getting all these guys on the same page that is the real bugaboo. Bondra-Khristich-Carpenter Bob Carpenter: 7 weight, 4/4 skating, 3/2 shot, 3 sth, 4 pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L While not a special player by any means, Carpenter does have some of the more important skills to be a decent assist man, skating and passing ability. Carpenter can dangle a bit more than Ridley and this should be put to use in order to give Khristich the time to lumber up ice and become available for a one timer. The shooting stats are not inspiring though, defenses will likely sag a bit more to the other options since Carpenter doesn’t need to be respected from range. While this line may not have as much high end potential as the first one, it should be a bit more consistent. Khristich can really rip the one-timers, if he gets his chances, he will produce. As for Bondra, putting him on his natural wing still allows him to be a dangerous player as he can use his wide array of dekes and float shots to assault opposing goalies. Also, when the need arises, he will now be on his forehand, which should help him pass the puck with more velocity and accuracy when the defenses converge on him. Other Options: There isn’t a lot of speed or skill on the bench for Washington, most of these guys are fringe GDL draft options. Kelly Miller: 8 weight, 4/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 4 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L Sort of the in between option of Carpenter and Ridley, Miller is more of a plugger than anything else. The plus skills and skating get balanced out by the near heavyweight status, the definition of a fringe player. Pat Elynuik: 6 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/5 shot, 3 sth, 2 pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: R A one trick pony, Elynuik can snipe the biscuit, not a bad guy to stash in the 6th forward spot and hope never sees the light of day. Michal Pivonka: 8 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/3 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L Another statue with a slightly above average skill set. It’s good to know that if the Caps lose 3 of these guys in a game that there is still another one floating around. Forwards: 6/10 Defense: To further compound the frustrations of the Capitals roster, the two highest rated defenseman are nearly impossible to ice. Luckily, there is still a serviceable pairing to be found. Johansson-Cote Calle Johansson: 9 weight, 4/3 skating, 4/1 shot, 4 sth & pass, 3/ 4 aware, Shoots: L For whatever reason, Johansson seems to get much better reviews then another fellow heavyweight, Igor Kravchuk. Go back and look at Kravchuk’s ratings, I’ll wait. You back now? Pretty damn similar aren’t they? Johansson may not be fleet of foot, but he’s got it where it counts, he can move the puck, he can skate, and he’s a cerebral player that uses the poke check and holding to survive against on rushing forwards. He fits in nicely on his natural side and by not sticking him behind Ridley, it evens out the fatties on the ice by not isolating them together. Sylvain Cote: 6 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/2 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/ 4 aware, Shoots: R The lone option on the blue line that isn’t at the mercy of the weight bug, Cote is a serviceable defenseman and a perfectly fine #2 option, but he’s stretched a little thin on the Caps. There isn’t a whole lot to say about Cote because of how unremarkable he is. He isn’t slow, but he’s liable to get ditched by speedsters. He isn’t fat, but he can’t exactly dominate the game physically. He won’t kill the team offensively, but he isn’t about to kick start an onslaught either. Cote is just a man, appreciate what he does, you could be a lot worse off. A perfectly capable duo, they just aren’t going to carry this underwhelming team to the promise land. They will need to be on their “A” game though as the goaltending situation isn’t something to be relied upon. Cote-Iafrate Al Iafrate: 11 weight, 4/4 skating, 6/2 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/4 aware, Shoots: L Who doesn’t love 6 shot power? I know I sure as hell love it, I just wish Iafrate came in a package that made it a bit easier to unleash it on a regular basis. Alas, with his super heavyweight status, Iafrate’s total skill package is very difficult to use as most any forward in the league can dump him on his keyster with a simple body check. As long as he stays on his skates though, Iafrate is easily Washington’s most skilled and dangerous defenseman. This setup leaves Ridley and Iafrate isolated together on the right, but putting Iafrate on his natural side doesn’t make any sense either since he can’t easily unleash his howler of a slapper. Other Options: Kevin Hatcher: 12 weight, 3/3 skating, 5/2 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/4 aware, Shoots: R Despite owning a well above average skill set for a defenseman, Hatcher is nearly impossible to ice due to his weight and sluggish skating. It’s a real shame, two 5+ slap shot power shooters on the blueline could really cause some problems for opposing goalies. Defense: 5/10 Goalie Zone: In dire need of a rock in net, the Caps have themselves the 2nd worst starting goalie among non-expansion teams. Don Beaupre: 4 weight, 3/ 4 skating, 3 puck control, 3/3/3/3 save, Catches: L A perfectly cromulent goalie, Beaupre is usually passable for a manual control goalie extraordinaire as he is lightweight and fairly mobile. In auto goalie mode though, Beaupre is a prime target for all types of offense and he won’t put up much objection. Goalies: 3.5/10 Bottom Line: Washington is amongst the most frustrating teams to use among the established franchises. A lack of chemistry, plus talent, and goaltending leaves Washington on the sidelines of almost every classic league. Want a challenge, win it all with Washington.
  16. angryjay93

    Washington Capitals

  17. angryjay93

    2018 2v2 League Idea.

    I'd prefer to not be a captain because I don't think I'd play consistently enough
  18. angryjay93

    2018 2v2 League Idea.

    I would be interested in being one of the players in the pool.
  19. angryjay93

    Pittsburgh Penguins

  20. angryjay93

    Pittsburgh Penguins

    Pittsburgh Penguins Team Overview: To the untrained eye, Pittsburgh looks like a world beater of a team, what with Mario Lemieux and his 100 rating. Alas, the real life story is vastly different and it is indeed a difficult task to find a competitive line, especially for those who don't specialize in one-timers. The defense is also inflicted with similar problems as the offense, looks great, but plays below the expected level. Forwards: This forward group reminds me a lot of Edmonton, except it doesn't have a top 15 forward such as Petr Klima. The biggest issue facing the Penguins is a lack of speed, weight advantage and shooting. A choice must be made, load up a line with heavy guys with skills or use a line featuring weight buggers with marginal skills. Choosing the middle road isn't an attractive option due to the fact that there will be very few strengths to utilize. Feed Lemieux: Mullen-Lemieux-Jagr Joe Mullen: 6 weight, 4/3 skating, 3/5 shot, 4 sth, 3 pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: R Joe Mullen is plan B when it comes to scoring, his 3/5 right handed shot on the left wing is very useful for unloading one timers. With Lemieux, Jagr, and Murphy passing the puck, Mullen should get ample opportunity to shoot. Mullen's other key attribute is his 6 weight, he is by far the most skilled Penguin at an acceptable weight, thus allowing him to be effective on defense and able to carry the puck up ice without getting mauled easily. So, whats Mullen's glaring issue you ask? His speed, only a 4/3 skater, he is not the fleet footed man this line is desperately in need of, also, hes a mediocre 3 passer, not ideal for a guy carrying the puck a lot. Mario Lemieux: 10 weight, 5/4 skating, 4/6 shot, 6 sth & pass, 6/4 aware, Shoots: R Lemieux is easily the most skilled player in the entire game, 4/6 shot, 6 sth, 6 pass, 5/4 skating, 6 off aware, Lemieux is the total package...except for his bulky 10 weight. Due to the fact that he can get knocked down by the majority of players in the game, Lemieux is at a distinct disadvantage when carrying the puck up the ice or dancing in the offensive zone. The user must be adept at picking their spots when deciding to go 1 on 1, if successful; Lemieux has all the tools to succeed. Where Le Magnifique really shines though is in his one-timing ability, he just sits in the slot and picks corners with sniper precision, this should be the main method of goal scoring. Jaromir Jagr: 10 weight, 5/4 skating, 3/3 shot, 5 sth, 4 pass, 4/3 aware, Shoots: L One of the more frustrating players in the game to use, Jagr is more or less in this spot by default due to his 5/4 skating, 5 sth, and 4 passing. Those skills are limited though by his 10 weight and 3/3 shot. Jagr must be used cautiously on offense, he is prone to being pushed around very easily, his passing and skating skills must be used to perfection to get much production out of him. Typically, Jagr will get attacked with vicious body checks, which could bring the defense out of position opening up a passing lane to Lemieux or Mullen, take advantage of it and try to get some quick offense. Defensively, Jagr isn't much help aside from the pokecheck. This line doesn't provide a lot of 1 on 1 razzle dazzle or defensive prowess. What it does provide though is a skilled line that should be able to cash in on a high percentage of its chances, which will be vital since chances likely won't be aplenty. Grinding Wings: Mullen-Lemieux-Straka Martin Straka: 5 weight, 3/3 skating, 2/2 shot, 2 sth, 3 pass, 3/2 aware, Shoots: L Martin Straka is your run of the mill weight bugger, 3/3 skating, 5 weight. All we're trying to get out of him is some solid defense on a team bloated with heavyweights. He is capable of carrying the puck up the ice and using his 3 passing to dish off to Lemieux or Mullen. Don't get carried away with Straka on offense though, only a select few are capable of squeezing production out of him on a consistent basis. To Hell with Skill: Straka-Mullen-Mceachern Shawn McEachern: 7 weight, 3/3 skating, 3/3 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/3 aware, Shoots: L Mceachern is just a beefed up version of Straka, 7 weight and a 3/3 shot and skating, there isn't much at all special about Mceachern, but for those managers looking for the most capable weight bug line available should look no further. This line possesses a capable scorer in the middle and some feisty wingers, but it provides nothing more than expansion like speed and could easily be overwhelmed by a faster team. Other options: There are three other players I have yet to mention who possess varying skills...but of course, have maddening weaknesses. Ron Francis: 9 weight, 4/3 skating, 4/3 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/4 aware, Shoots: L Ron Francis is the most balanced of the three, but that doesn't help too much considering hes only a 4/3 skater with a 4/3 shot at 9 weight. He doesn't provide anything particularily helpful to any line combo, but he might fit in somewhere. Kevin Stevens: 11 weight, 3/4 skating, 3/4 shot, 4 sth & pass, 5/3 aware, Shoots: L Kevin Stevens is another frustrating player in that he has this great 77 overall rating, but produces very little on the ice. At 11 weight and 3/4 skating, Stevens is not suited to use his 4 passing or 3/4 shot effectively because he spends so much of his time on his butt. But if you got a thing for Stevens, then go for it. Rick Tocchet: 9 weight, 2/2 skating, 4/5 shot, 3 sth & pass, 5/4 aware, Shoots: R Lastly, Rick Tocchet possesses one of those coveted 4/5 shots, but at 2/2 speed and 9 weight, it won't get used often. He is one of the worst puck carriers in the league, and thus should only be used as a one timing option. As a whole, this group is at a real disadvantage, it takes a lot of solid passing, creativity, and timing to utilize any trio that is iced. Forwards Rating: 4.5/10 Defense: Aside from Ulf Samuelsson and Larry Murphy, there isn't a whole lot of depth in this unit. With that said, this group isn't completely lost, between Murphy and Samuelsson, this is a skilled duo that can pass the puck around effectively and help keep the fore checkers at bay. Murphy-Samuelsson Larry Murphy: 10 weight, 4/3 skating, 4/2 shot, 4 sth & pass, 4/5 aware, Shoots: R Murphy has some elite skills at defense, 4/2 shot, 4 passing and sth, and 4/5 awareness. The downside is his 10 weight and slightly above average 4/3 skating. I find it preferable to hide Murphy behind Mullen or Straka because they can then help cut down or slow down on rushing forwards into Murphys area and it allows him to be a bit more freewheeling with his rushes up the ice. Although he isn't a quality body checker, Murphy does seem rather adept at protecting the slot in the defensive zone and picking off many passes that come his way, thus salvaging at least a little defensive value from him. Ulf Samuelsson: 8 weight, 4/4 skating, 3/0 shot, 3 sth & pass, 3/5 aware, Shoots: L Ulf is a very solid defensive option, even though he is not a great open ice hitter, his 5 defensive awareness will often times keep him in the defensive zone protecting the slot. Like Murphy, Ulf is also adept at snuffing out passes in the offensive zone, hopefully that skill can help kick start some counter attacks. What really makes Ulf useful though is his 4/4 skating, this skill allows him to keep up with some of the faster forwards in the game and apply a solid poke check. Other Options: Paul Stanton: 8 weight, 3/3 skating, 4/1 shot, 2 sth, 4 pass, 2/3 aware, Shoots: R If injuries or penalties arise, Paul Stanton is the best option, his 3/3 skating, 4 passing and 4/1 shot at 8 weight allow for a lot of the same skills that Murphy has in a slightly more user friendly package. Brian Fogarty: 8 weight, 1/1 speed, 1/0 shot, 2 sth, 1 pass, 2/1 aware, Shoots: L Memo to new users, you don't get to draft this guy unless you are from Pittsburgh or you get clearance from the Pittsburgh boys, capiche? Defense Rating: 6/10 Goalie Zone: Tom Barrasso: 10 weight, 4/4 skating, 4 puck control, 4/4/4/4 save, Catch: R With 4 ratings all across the board, Barrasso couldn't be much more solid without being spectacular. At 10 weight he can be a bit cumbersome to use in net as his acceleration is lacking, on the flip side, he will be very tough to ram into the net. He is typically picked in the top 5-10 goalies in most draft leagues and performs reasonably well. Goalie Zone: 7/10 Final Word: Typically in the discussion for worst non-expansion team, the Penguins are a very difficult team to use. Despite this fact though, most users seem to do fairly well with them in classic league play, which means the skills of Lemieux, Samuelsson, Murphy, and Barrasso must be getting this team somewhere.
  21. I drew up some numbers during lunch and have come to these conclusions. Forwards: - At 60 overall a forwards skills become rudimentary. Only a handful of players have a skill rating of 4 (sth, pass, or shp) No player has more than one skill with a 4 rating. - Essentially all we are doing is weeding out who can skate and potential weight buggers. In a 6 team league there are 18 starting forwards and 12 subs. - I think 55 is an interesting break. It maintains the players with a 4 skill but cuts down on the players who have 4 agility or 4 speed to roughly 1-2 forwards per team. Only 3 players would be a 4/4 skater. - Weight buggers could be a bit of an issue. With such porous skating they and CB checkers really become beefed up but I focus more on weight buggers since everyone can use them easily. At 55 overall there are 15 players at 4 or 5 weight. At 50 overall there are only 6. Defense: - Anything above 50 seems too high, as there isn't a premium on any skill and we will all likely have similar defenses. -The most interesting breaks are at 50, 48 and 46 overall. At 50 overall our starters will all likely be fairly competent. At 48 one guy will be competent and the other might be a bit rough. At 46 only a few teams will have a competent defender and the rest will be pretty lackluster. - I vote for 46, the other two cutoffs do allow for some decent defenders but the lack of separation between them doesn't allow for much in the way of true standouts. Goalie: - I haven't done much research here but I have two thoughts. Either go with the 6 worst goalies (or however many teams there are) or use some cut off like 45.
  22. I'll work the spreadsheets when I get home. My initial thoughts are. Forwards Max overall 55-60 Defenseman Max overall 50 Goalies Max overall 47 I like all of coaches ideas. Maybe one created player per team because one of the appealing things about this league is using guys on the rom that would never be otherwise used.
  23. This type of thing is obviously my jam so yes id be interested if i have the time and classic league doesnt take place. The only thing I would possibly reconsider is raising the minimum attributes from 50 to 55-60 for Forwards. Once you get down to 50 rated forwards, it becomes very bad very fast.